Berry College Elementary & Middle School Library

The Salem witch trials

345.7 BEN

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The Salem witch trials

Benoit, Peter, 1955- author.

New York Children's Press 2014

64 pages illustrations (some color), color maps 24 cm.

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Presents the history of the 1692 Salem witch trials through primary and secondary materials. Discusses how they began, how the witches were tried, why the number of trials grew, and how the trials impacted history. Includes photographs, a list of notable individuals, a map, a timeline, a glossary, and further reading sources.

Reading Counts: Level 8.6 / 5.0 Points / 61841.

Lexile: 1020L

Available

RegularRegular

1 copy available at Berry College Elementary & Middle School

ISBN:

9780531276716

LC Call No:

KFM2478.8.W5 B46 2014

Dewey Class No:

345.744/5/0288 23

Author:

Benoit, Peter, 1955- author.

Title:

The Salem witch trials by Peter Benoit.

Physical:

64 pages illustrations (some color), color maps 24 cm.

ContentType:

text rdacontent

MediaType:

unmediated rdamedia

CarrierType:

volume rdacarrier

Series:

Cornerstones of freedom

BibliogrphyNote:

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Summary:

Presents the history of the 1692 Salem witch trials through primary and secondary materials. Discusses how they began, how the witches were tried, why the number of trials grew, and how the trials impacted history. Includes photographs, a list of notable individuals, a map, a timeline, a glossary, and further reading sources.

Target Audience:

1020 Lexile. 0

Target Audience:

7.

Target Audience:

4-6.

Study Program:

Accelerated Reader MG 7.0 1.0 162882.

Study Program:

Reading Counts RC 8.6 5.0 61841.

Subject:

Trials (Witchcraft)--Massachusetts--Salem

Subject:

Trials (Witchcraft)

Subject:

Witches--Massachusetts

SAE:UnifrmTitle:

Cornerstones of freedom.

Link:

View cover image provided by Mackin

Patron Reviews

Review by Lee Lynn.
I would recommend this book to you if you are interested in the seemingly absurd wrongnesses of the past, and why they seemed so believable at the time. I would also recommend this to you if you like theology or religious study, as religion is what sparked the trials.
This book is about the "Salem Witch Trials," a period in American history in which thirteen women and two men were executed on false accusations of witchcraft. It was sparked by the town pastor's servant, who often showed the pastor's daughters to tell who their future husband would be, and how to tell their babies' gender based on the feel of their baby bump.
I really enjoyed this book because it tells many of the stories of the victims of the witch trials. However, I dislike this book because it doesn't go into depth about many of the court system's practices or policies, nor does it mention secondary cases of witch trials near Salem Village or the science as to why the accusers really were seeing things like their enemies' spectres.

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